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The Native Plant Society of New Jersey is a non-profit organization founded in 1985.

We have over 1,400 members and are organized into county and regional chapters. Our members include gardeners, horticulturists, naturalists, landscape designers, students, and native plant enthusiasts from all walks of life.

Our mission is to promote the appreciation, protection, and study of New Jersey’s Native Flora.

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May Webinar – Connecting Kids to Nature: Creating and Maintaining School Gardens 

May 15, 2024
7pm
Webinar

with 
Sarah Paulsen and Dena Corbin,
of the Essex Chapter team behind the School Guide

Engaging kids to learn about native plants is vital to our planet’s future. Two speakers, contributors to the recently published NPSNJ’s “Native Plant School Guide,” will delve into the nuts and bolts of establishing native plant gardens in school gardens that not only serve as food and habitat for pollinators and birds but also provide valuable learning opportunities.

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April is
Native Plant Month

Join the NPSNJ Bioblitz on iNaturalist

Help NPSNJ in this citizen science initiative to photograph and tag plants throughout our state.

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Donation Form Temporarily Offline

We have had a massive hacking attempt in which a criminal ran 16,000 credit card numbers on our site. We contacted the software vendor whose plug in was used to do this and have taken our donation form offline for a week or two as we rebuild the donation system from scratch to prevent abuse in the future.

2024 NPSNJ Bioblitz

April is national Native Plant Month! Join NPSNJ for our statewide Bioblitz on iNaturalist.org, a free, worldwide, educational Internet tool allowing anybody to report plant and animal species and allowing scientists to use the resulting data. The objective is to report as many native species as possible and to get as many people involved as possible (everybody is a naturalist!). Anybody can participate (members, non-members, family, friends, friends of friends, etc.). Non-native plants can be reported as well since in many cases we don’t know if it is native or not until the identification has been ascertained. Read more here.

Advocacy Alert: Check Your Town’s Tree Removal and Replacement Ordinance

The Department of Environmental Protection has issued a requirement for New Jersey towns to adopt ordinances for tree removal by May 1 and replacement in order to comply with stormwater permits. However, there are concerns that these ordinances may limit tree species diversity and include non-native or invasive species, which goes against ecological best practices. It’s recommended to review local ordinances for the diversity and appropriateness of tree species and to advocate for amendments if necessary. Read more here.

2024 NPSNJ Grants

The Native Plant Society of New Jersey welcomes new project proposals for two types of grants as well as for a student video fellowship. All applicants must be residents of New Jersey and, except for student video fellowship applicants, must be members of the Society. Non-profit organizations may join as non-profit members or apply through a member sponsor. find out more and apply here

Events List

Upcoming Events

2024 Native Plants of the Year

Backyard Perennial of the Year (2024)

Backyard Perennial of the Year (2024)

Great Blue Lobelia
Lobelia siphilitica

Lobelia siphilitica, Great Blue Lobelia, is the blue brother of remarkably red cardinal flower, L. cardinalis. They are both part of the very garden-worthy bellflower family, Campanulaceae. In the wild, where it is thrilling to come upon, Great Blue Lobelia is most often seen in part sun to part shade, near streams, sloughs, and other wetlands, telling you that in the garden it prefers moist soil. Where content, it attains a height of two to three feet and colonizes through self-seeding. In most gardens, it persists for years. The summer flowers of Great Blue Lobelia are various shades of violet-blue, lipped, lobed, and arranged on a long stalk. They are an important food source for several native bees, bumblebees, and hummingbirds. Photo by Mary Free, Master Gardeners of Northern Virginia

Read more
Rare Plant of the Year (2024)

Rare Plant of the Year (2024)

Pink Lady’s Slipper
Cypripedium acaule

Seeing Pink Lady’s Slipper on a walk in the woods, sometime in May, a plant lover’s endorphins really kick-in. The pink and tan flower has an unusual moccasin shape and dangles from a stem that rises from a pair of veined basal leaves. It has a unique design feature for pollination by bumblebees, which requires them to follow a one-way path through the flower, forcing insects to take a pre-determined route past its reproductive parts, sort like the way Ikea makes you travel past all their sales displays before you get to the exit. Cypripedium acaule is not common but can readily be seen at various places in New Jersey, such as near Ramapo Lake in Bergen County and at Cheesequake Park near the center of the state.

Read more

Some Great Plants from Hubert and Millie Ling’s Awesome Native Plants Site

The Native Plant Society of New Jersey is a statewide non-profit organization dedicated to the appreciation, protection, and study of the native flora of New Jersey. Founded in 1985, we have over a thousand members across the state, and are organized into county and regional chapters. Our members include gardeners, horticulturists, naturalists, landscape designers, students, and native plant enthusiasts from all walks of life.

Our mission is to promote the appreciation, protection, and study of New Jersey’s Native Flora.    

April is Native Plant Month
Help Plant Scientists with
NPSNJ’s First Bioblitz on iNaturalist.org

Find out more here


Donation Form Temporarily Offline

We have had a massive hacking attempt in which a criminal ran 16,000 credit card numbers on our site. We contacted the software vendor whose plug in was used to do this and have taken our donation form offline for a week or two as we rebuild the donation system from scratch to prevent abuse in the future.

2024 NPSNJ Bioblitz

April is national Native Plant Month! Join NPSNJ for our statewide Bioblitz on iNaturalist.org, a free, worldwide, educational Internet tool allowing anybody to report plant and animal species and allowing scientists to use the resulting data. The objective is to report as many native species as possible and to get as many people involved as possible (everybody is a naturalist!). Anybody can participate (members, non-members, family, friends, friends of friends, etc.). Non-native plants can be reported as well since in many cases we don’t know if it is native or not until the identification has been ascertained. Read more here.

Advocacy Alert: Check Your Town’s Tree Removal and Replacement Ordinance

The Department of Environmental Protection has issued a requirement for New Jersey towns to adopt ordinances for tree removal by May 1 and replacement in order to comply with stormwater permits. However, there are concerns that these ordinances may limit tree species diversity and include non-native or invasive species, which goes against ecological best practices. It’s recommended to review local ordinances for the diversity and appropriateness of tree species and to advocate for amendments if necessary. Read more here.

2024 NPSNJ Grants

The Native Plant Society of New Jersey welcomes new project proposals for two types of grants as well as for a student video fellowship. All applicants must be residents of New Jersey and, except for student video fellowship applicants, must be members of the Society. Non-profit organizations may join as non-profit members or apply through a member sponsor. find out more and apply here

Events List

Upcoming Events

2024 Native Plants of the Year

Backyard Perennial of the Year (2024)

Backyard Perennial of the Year (2024)

Great Blue Lobelia
Lobelia siphilitica

Lobelia siphilitica, Great Blue Lobelia, is the blue brother of remarkably red cardinal flower, L. cardinalis. They are both part of the very garden-worthy bellflower family, Campanulaceae. In the wild, where it is thrilling to come upon, Great Blue Lobelia is most often seen in part sun to part shade, near streams, sloughs, and other wetlands, telling you that in the garden it prefers moist soil. Where content, it attains a height of two to three feet and colonizes through self-seeding. In most gardens, it persists for years. The summer flowers of Great Blue Lobelia are various shades of violet-blue, lipped, lobed, and arranged on a long stalk. They are an important food source for several native bees, bumblebees, and hummingbirds. Photo by Mary Free, Master Gardeners of Northern Virginia

Read more
Rare Plant of the Year (2024)

Rare Plant of the Year (2024)

Pink Lady’s Slipper
Cypripedium acaule

Seeing Pink Lady’s Slipper on a walk in the woods, sometime in May, a plant lover’s endorphins really kick-in. The pink and tan flower has an unusual moccasin shape and dangles from a stem that rises from a pair of veined basal leaves. It has a unique design feature for pollination by bumblebees, which requires them to follow a one-way path through the flower, forcing insects to take a pre-determined route past its reproductive parts, sort like the way Ikea makes you travel past all their sales displays before you get to the exit. Cypripedium acaule is not common but can readily be seen at various places in New Jersey, such as near Ramapo Lake in Bergen County and at Cheesequake Park near the center of the state.

Read more

Flowering Early Spring

Round lobed Hepatica – Hepatica americana

These delightful flowers of pastel pinks and blues will be blooming soon. We have seen them as early as April 6.

On a sunny day on the trail hepaticas will dot the brown forest floor along with bloodroots. Already up (3/28) are spring beauty and spicebush flowers.

Round lobed Hepatica is not a spring ephemeral. It has evergreen leaves that over winter.

It forms new leaves after flowering. Another aid to survival, it will self-pollinate if cross pollination fails. Bloodroot also does this.

Read about Round Lobed Hepatica here

See our Spring Plant Profiles & Photos

SPRING is in the AIR

Twinleaf – Jeffersonia diphylla

As you are out looking for early spring flowers you would be lucky to spot one of these showy white flowers. These flowers have a distinctive way of shedding their pollen. Their distinctive leaves gives it the name ‘Twinleaf’

Twinleaf is critically imperiled (S1). However, they would be a fine addition in a shady spot in your garden. Twinleaf is not an ephemeral and its leaves will make a distinctive ground cover in the summer.


Keep this rare plant alive in NJ; plant one this year. Blooms mid April.

Read more and photos on Twinleaf .

Also see our ‘Gardener’s News’ article ‘Flower For A Day‘ .

SPRING is in the AIR

Broom Crowberry – Corema conradii

Broom crowberry is a ground-hugging, shrubby plant. It needs open, sandy areas to grow and has specialized wildfire needs.

In NJ it exists only in the Pinelands. It is G4, S2. The NJ DEP is attempting to restore habitat for this plant.

It blooms mid March to early April. We have the best photos of the male and female flowers. See what the Broom Crowberry flowers look like!.

In central and north Jersey, skunk cabbage is starting. In our winter walks we have already have seen spring beauty leaves peeking above the leaf litter. Soon spring beauty and bloodroots will be blooming.

See our Spring Plant Profiles & Photos

A Christmas Wish

Castilleja coccinea – Scarlet Indian Paintbrush -New Page

Did you know that there is a indian paintbrush (Castilleja) in the east and is native to NJ?

At one time it was found in almost every county in NJ!

It has not been seen in NJ for years! It would be wonderful to see this showy plant again in NJ! 

Read about Scarlet Indian Paintbrush here